Rabu, 19 Maret 2014

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GAZPROM THE BIGGEST CASUALTY IN CRIMEA CRISIS AFTERMATH
Merkel declares Germany free of Russian gas
Dateline: 5 April 2019
Yesterday, Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that Germany had achieved a new level of energy security and independence.
"It has taken us five years to wean ourselves from Russian gas but today I can announce that the last Gazprom supplies are being officially switched off."
In March 2014, Russia claimed Crimea as their own. In the diplomatic crisis that ensued, Russia held an economic weapon - Europe's dependence on gas supplies from the east. The crisis was a catalyst for EU leaders to rethink their strategic energy positions. Germany, as the largest single consumer of Russian gas, began doing the only thing it could; building new infrastructure to access new gas sources.
The political response in Europe may have done little for Ukraine, but it has pushed forward legislation to create a common energy market and Europe entered the fracking industry a lot more enthusiastically. Alternative sources of shale gas from the UK to Estonia now supply 10% of Europe's gas demand.
Qatar is the biggest beneficiary of the gas shake-up, with new port capacity in the Netherlands and Spain to accept their LNG shipments. New gas supplies from Australia and a new off-shore facility near Israel, along with increased production in Norway and the Netherlands, have gradually replaced the European Union's dependence on Russian gas imports.
The Russian economy has faltered, and Gazprom, once the largest energy supplier in the world, has been forced to slash prices to keep customers. All of this comes too late for the people of Ukraine, but it is the least that Germany can do. Ironically, the Ukraine itself still gets half its gas from Russia; it has no other choice.
Published 20 March 2014
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Links to related stories
1. How the West can peacefully push Putin out of Ukraine - The Week, 3 March 2014
2. Gazprom vs. Chevron: A battle of Titans over the future of an energy island - Beyond the EU, 19 July 2013
3. Unconventional Gas: Potential Energy Market Impacts in the European Union - Ivan Pearson,et al., JRC Scientific and Policy Reports, 2012 [PDF]
4. Poland's shale drive will transform Europe, if it does not drop the ball - The Telegraph, 21 August 2013
5. Ukraine crisis: Europe's stored gas high as prices soar - Simon Tulett, BBC, 3 March 2014
6. Ukraine Seen Building Support for U.S. Natural Gas Export - Bloomberg, 4 March 2014
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